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Comments

  • deviant_mischief

    deviant_mischief

    March 11, 2015, 1:14 am

    Who should I fighting against? The powers that be already entrenched with vast wealth and connections or the general populous which on the whole votes with emotions/ideology rather than common sense and displays an absurd lack of critical thinking? The only way I see it is to be a champion for education and hope that generation taught to think for themselves will do better, then again it could just boil down human nature and greed, not something I see us evolving past in my lifetime, (Not the US capitalist culture at least) Only takes one greedy corrupt person to lead one thousands others to their demise and convince them to be smiling and happy along way, so far even they will give this person money for screwing them in the ass. Lots of masochist voters/political supporters if you ask me.

    They don't know Bush or Obama or even know what is going on, but I bet you can find plenty that *believe* in one of those leaders and that is good enough to pull the lever.

    To beat them at their game you have to play it first, most decent people I feel are not willing to do so or maybe I completely naive when it comes to reality.

    edit: so to answer the question, yes, I have very little power against greed and idol worship when fighting a population raised on that sort of thing.

    Reply

  • TheCrimsonKing

    TheCrimsonKing

    March 10, 2015, 2:40 pm

    >Glenn Beck is not a problem, he's a person who says stupid shit now and then

    Beck and his FSN buddies pretty much created the Tea Parties, they are not reporting on the opposition they are fueling and promoting it under the guise of a fair and balanced news station. It's a huge problem in the country because we allow them to control the public debate and give legitimacy to lies and misinformation which ultimately end up shaping public policy. Like it or not the media has a much larger influence on politics in this country that anything other than possibly lobbyists.

    >It's also what got his ratings to increase. Do you think he gives a fuck if he's temporarily lost some advertising revenue if his ratings are increasing?

    Beck may not care but Rupert Murdoch cares, News Corp care, and most importantly the share holders care. Moral outrage alone will never change Beck and FSN, but when moral outrage affects the bottom-line things start to change fast. Multiple biographers and friends have said that if Murdoch though he would make more money from FSN by switching it to a liberal news station he would do it in a second, it's all about the money.

    >Yes, change the world that will. Instead of discussing and organizing for real issues let's just spend our time trying to take down some jackass who gets paid to make a fool of himself on TV, only to end up encouraging him in the long run.

    His viewers and advertisers are what encourages him, not the opposition, though I'm sure he'd love for people to think that. If we influence his viewers or advertisers we influence FSN's money and through that it's policy.

    Reply

  • __david__

    __david__

    March 11, 2015, 2:38 am

    I believe it is because the original CD spec (the Red Book) specified that there must be a 2 second gap between tracks. The gap is marked which you can tell because your old school CD player will count up from -2 to 0. I don't have a copy of the Red Book spec to verify this.

    As CD players got better people started pushing the boundaries of Red Book compliance which is why you can buy CDs that hold more than 79 minutes of music (they are technically violating the spec by putting the "bit groove" (I know it's not really a groove) too close together but CD players are made so well that it generally doesn't matter). Same thing with the gap-less tracks. I think it's technically a violation of the spec (and I remember there was some major "how did they do that" talk when the first CDs came out with gapless tracks *and* didn't cross a track at an even 1 second boundary).

    Reply

  • Ardentfrost

    Ardentfrost

    March 11, 2015, 12:35 am

    The general rule is you transplant when they aren't producing fruit. For instance, if you order blueberries (which I did last year), they come in November. That gives them their entire off season to focus on establishing themselves in the ground, and they're ready to produce the following June.

    Raspberries produce June through Fall. Just from that, I would assume you'd want to transplant early spring or late winter. That'll give them a few good months to establish before they'll want to focus on berries.

    And that reminds me, I have strawberries I need to transplant...

    EDIT: I just noticed the OP's last sentence... I might suggest planting them in the ground now since you've already uprooted them. Uprooting is what causes the damage, not planting.

    Reply

  • F4il3d

    F4il3d

    March 11, 2015, 7:13 am

    So the solution is to try to pass legislation to make lobbying illegal. Health care reform in any way shape or form will fall pray to whatever those who bought and payed for the legislators want. The same with Penal reform, education reform and any legislation that is proposed to better the status quo. Yes the system is broken, yes the proposed solutions are insufficient, but to know about the source of the flaw and not take any action to correct it is unconscionable. It is like being a lemming in the pack, knowing full well what awaits at the bottom of the cliff but saying to yourself, we are doomed, we cannot defeat gravity, rather than at least trying to show the pack that there may be a better way.

    Edit:

    Added. Look we are agreeing that the Lobbies are the problem. Our only source of disagreement here is that I believe that "public option" is a bit better than the alternatives. You are right lets figure out how to defeat the lobbies and then start dealing with full meaningful solutions but while we figure that one out, lets apply a band-aid to that decapitation called the current health care industry.

    Reply

  • FeepingCreature

    FeepingCreature

    March 11, 2015, 12:47 am

    Personally, I'm fairly sure no-one does. :)

    If one believes in that, the experience of the copy would be equal to the experience of the original, and the terms would momentarily lose meaning.

    In any case: how do you define "continuous"?

    Did you ever nod off while listening to a teacher? Did you ever get so engrossed in something that you realized with a start, hours later, how much time had passed? Why do these not count as interruptions of consciousness; phases when large parts of your brain are basically off doing their own thing?

    Reply

  • dayresidue

    dayresidue

    March 10, 2015, 10:16 pm

    one more question (sorry), were you doing meth when you got infected?

    i have read a lot about gay men in the 90's going to raves and doing lots of meth, which seriously lowered their inhibitions, naturally.

    there is also a great documentary about it called "Meth," it's SO good, you should watch it, if you ever get a chance. it's about meth, but it's more about these men with hiv, and you just listen to them talk of their experiences, and your heart goes out to them.

    anyway, this whole Q&A really reminds me of that particular aspect of the film. i really enjoyed it.

    thanks again for the chat, i wish you all of the best!<3

    Reply

  • antifolkhero

    antifolkhero

    March 10, 2015, 10:25 pm

    >it feels less like of an important stylistic step forward for the band.

    Completely disagree with you there. Kid A, which I agree was a great album, was exactly what you said: an experiment. It was Radiohead still searching for new sounds and approaches to their music. It was a stepping stone in the development of their sound. However, In Rainbows, at least for me, was the first time since OK Computer that Radiohead seemed to effectively connect their talent for writing great pop songwriting with the innovative sounds they developed from albums like Kid A and Amnesiac. In Rainbows was the first time that they both sides came together and worked most effectively. Every song on that album is brilliant and sounds nothing like any other band or like previous Radiohead albums or songs.

    Reply

  • snowpup

    snowpup

    March 10, 2015, 4:33 pm

    Not the OP, but I did this for a while..

    1. We made regular deliveries to a VA hospital in the area and it often made for strange experiences. Patents would place orders and forget 10 minutes later, so basically no one was there to pick up the order. Some times they would make orders without having money to pay, so the nurses would often have to pay, and they did this with varying degrees of willingness.

    2. No

    3. It usually depends on the manager, some will let you make a free pizza, others will be fine with you eating a mistake pizza and understood that sometimes we may make that mistake pizza on purpose.

    4. Regulars yes, but not exceptionally obese that I can remember anyway

    5. Yes, the best tip I got was from a 5 year old kid whose mom must have just told him to hand me all the money she had in her wallet. He gave me 60 bucks (3 $20 bills) for about a 12 dollar large pizza. That is a weekday night's worth of work alone!

    Reply

  • aem999

    aem999

    March 10, 2015, 8:15 am

    > Can someone tell me what is it that is so bad?

    In my experience of Java projects outsourced to Eastern Europe:

    * code better quality than that from India

    * few tests

    * too much questioning and debating

    * arrogant attitude

    * do not like taking instructions

    * require micro-management to ensure they do not go off on a tangent

    * cold demeanour not suitable for client facing roles

    => code that mostly does what it is supposed to but not adequately tested and costs more to deliver as it needs micro management

    Reply

  • theAtomicFireball

    theAtomicFireball

    March 11, 2015, 7:37 am

    Two things:

    A) Anybody with half a brain could answer these six questions with a few minutes of Googling.

    B) I would have answered pretty much the same way, though I learned far more from tinkering than from schooling.

    Just for grins and giggles, I'll go from memory. I don't work at Apple, but I know a thing or two about Objective-C. You can do one without the other, you know. They are completely orthogonal.

    1. NSArray

    2.

    NSMutableArray *array = [NSMutableArray array];

    or

    NSMutableArray *array = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:theSize];

    or

    NSMutableArray *array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:theSize];

    3. Not sure what you're asking. Standard practice in init and factory methods is to return self. The return type is id, which is a generic pointer to an Objective-C object. Init may return the same object that alloc returned, but doesn't have to.

    4.

    [myArray retain];

    (though this is not necessary with the alloc/init example above)

    5. You shouldn't. You can release it, but you should never "destroy" an object. Release it and if nothing else has retained it, then it will get deallocated. You release it by using

    [myArray release];

    6. Do you want a treatise? In short, Objective-C is an object-oriented superset of C based on the Smalltalk object model (unlike C++, Java, C#, etc. that derive their object model form Simula). It was originally implemented as a C preprocessor with a small runtime engine, the preprocessor has now been replaced by a dedicated compiler and the runtime engine has gotten more sophisticated. The 64-bit Mac runtime and the iPhone runtime offer improved security features and improved speed by leveraging C++ exceptions instead of a longjump operation, as well as a hybrid V-table dispatching for the most commonly used selectors.

    Reply

  • owlmanatt

    owlmanatt

    March 11, 2015, 1:46 am

    My friend ordered a laptop and one of the UPS managers snagged the box.

    This is a particularly bad idea when said friend's father works in the same UPS facility and happened to notice the package had gone missing, went to report it to his manager, *and found his manager with the fucking box open on his desk using the laptop*.

    The manager was fired the next day. I guess they had to wait for some guy who roams around Canada firing UPS employees to fly in or something ridiculous like that?

    Reply

  • dVnt

    dVnt

    March 11, 2015, 6:04 am

    All theists have doubt about their faith. It's part of the ideology, doctrine, and scripture to use that emotion to reinforce your faith. I don't know why your surprised to hear this from your father. Even people as religious as your father have the logic of rationality within them, they do make it through a day in this life don't they? Only, they've also trained themselves to partition it.

    Perhaps its not so dissimilar from a heroine addict, rationally concluding that they must stop doing heroine and allowing the stress of that realization to justify just *one* more dose.

    I'm glad your interaction turned out better than you feared. Family is a terrible thing to lose. I'm not talking to my mother right now because she admires Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck. There are personal beliefs, and then there are beliefs that will destroy the world... I'm trying to figure out some way to conclude that my civic duty can't include screaming at my mother as if she has down syndrome and is getting in the drivers seat of a race car.

    Reply

  • dptronz

    dptronz

    March 10, 2015, 7:10 pm

    As someone who has been in both (I was placed in there in the latter part of my elementary years) I can confirm that the program does give a sense of placement and achievement to those within, but also a bit of pretentiousness, or overinflated sense of self-worth to the students who are branded 'gifted' and 'talented'.

    When I was not in the program, in 3rd grade I remember approaching a group of GATE students on the playground, asking if they wanted to play Freeze Tag. I was ignored and eventually shunned away from the group. These kids seem to grow a gang mentality among their classmates. Maybe because they have the same sense of pride, but probably because they have been in the same class with each other since second grade and have developed a solidarity.

    Something else I remember clearly is that many of my classmate chums before the GATE program had holes in their shoes, played in the mud, and ate government-funded lunches. After placement within the program, many (not all) of my classmates enjoyed reading books, had parents who bought them the best clothes and drove them to school in luxury sedans, which is something I am indifferent to, but I think there is something to be said about how the program perpetuates a class divide in our public education system.

    Reply

  • jerf

    jerf

    March 11, 2015, 6:41 am

    It seems like the stopper here in general (not just this proposal particularly) is pattern matching failures, not the rest of the language. Has anyone explored something to put pattern matching into a library, beyond the apparently-inadequate-for-this-task view pattern feature?

    If Python taught me anything, it is that "special" language capabilities that can only be done by the runtime and can't be hooked by client code are one of those pernicious failures you can't even see in your language because you aren't even looking for it. A lot of Python's concision in an expert's hands comes from judicious overrides of the language syntax features to "do the right thing". If pattern matching could do the same thing, you might be able to fix the records issue cleanly, and offer who-knows-what-else too. (Would be a challenge to do, though, I acknowledge.)

    Reply

  • JoshSN

    JoshSN

    March 10, 2015, 11:48 pm

    Well, I have to admit, if I wanted to nice-as-I-can ask a couple suspects about a crime, I would want to ask them in separate rooms, to see if their stories match up.

    It's like that physics make-up exam. The two students had been out partying all weekend, and decided they couldn't show up for the Monday morning exam. They explained to the Professor that their car had gotten a flat, and they couldn't make it back to campus in time. The Professor obliged and the students were allowed to take a new exam the following day. The new exam had exactly one question: "Which tire?"

    Reply

  • unwind-protect

    unwind-protect

    March 10, 2015, 3:06 pm

    It never ceases to amaze me how overpriced (overvalued?) bottled water is.

    If I'm out and need a drink, I'll usually buy some milk, because it's cheaper than water. Let's think about this for a moment: to get milk you have to grow cows; bring them in twice a day for milking; refridgerate the milk and transport it to the processing plant; pasturize the milk; put it in bottles and transport it on a refridgerated truck to the shop where it is put on display in a refridgerator --- and if it's not sold in a few days, it has to be thrown away.

    And this is apparently cheaper than bottling water.

    Reply

  • omironia

    omironia

    March 10, 2015, 8:41 am

    This is what I'm facing:

    I've got 0.5TB personal & professional photos + 1.7TB personal videos + 1TB movies & music + ~0.3TB older personal & professional photos (stored on 77 DVDs).

    In addition to the 77 DVDs mentioned above, I am using:

    3x 1TB external HD + 320GB external HD + 500GB portable HD + brand new (still wrapped) 1TB external HD. I am slowly running out of free USB ports, power sockets, and physical space on my desk.

    I am about to transfer all of the photos on the DVDs to the external HDs.

    My photos are constantly increasing in numbers and file sizes, and so are my videos. The file sizes of my movies and music are most likely to stay the same but their numbers will definitely increase.

    These new 320GB BD disks seem like a good idea, but I doubt I'll repeat the experience I had with the 77 DVDs.

    So is there a better solution to what I'm using? I doubt there's a 10TB HD for the same price as 10x 1TB HD (or at least reasonably more expensive).

    Reply

  • therealjerrystaute

    therealjerrystaute

    March 10, 2015, 11:59 pm

    Yes, now that you mention it I think the show did offer that explanation. Unfortunately, it still doesn't wash. For as technology gets more advanced, it also gets more complicated, and there simply will be no substitute for having sentient software/hardware doing lots of our drudge work for us as things progress. Either we WILL have LOTS of A.I.s working for us-- or technological progress will basically cease altogether at some point. Maybe as soon as somewhere within the first half of the 21st century.

    You can already see the trend in action, with ever more processing power being embedded into all our gadgets and environments, like smart phones, smart homes, and smarter cars. Processing power is basically the raw material on which A.I. is built, and we appear inexorably headed towards using ever greater magnitudes of same.

    Of course, SG is fiction after all-- and the writers certainly have license to create their world as they see fit. It's just that given the show's tremendous scientific plausibility in so many other areas, I don't like seeing it falter in this one. And this one may be one of the most important tech fields of all, over the long run.

    Reply

  • Irielle

    Irielle

    March 11, 2015, 2:38 am

    Well the words he and she are called the masculine/feminine singular pronouns, so linguistically it would make sense to go by gender, not sex. If you're worried about the rudeness of people who disagree with your opinion (it being 'correct' is also just that), that's small potatoes compared to the rudeness (and even violence) toward the transgendered community.

    I didn't downvote you, but you have to realize that you are directly denying the personality that she is purposely projecting and that can be pretty discourteous. When my mentally handicapped friend explains his condition to someone I don't correct him and say, "No, you're not mentally handicapped - you're retarded."

    Are you suggesting that even after she is post-op people should call her 'he'? You must realize how crass that sounds.

    Reply

  • ToastToastsToast

    ToastToastsToast

    March 10, 2015, 12:22 pm

    I have an MSEE with a concentration in Signal Processing. Now, I'm going for my PhD in a very different field. I'm still using the same tools, but I get to tackle a different family of problems. So, you can say that I work for less than minimum wage with the hope that someday I'll be somebody important. Hence, I guess I am not that different from a fine arts major... (Note: I'm not ragging on fine arts majors. We just happen to share similar predicaments. Although I don't know if the street value of a mathematical equation is as good as that of a well-painted portrait.)

    Reply

  • jaydizz

    jaydizz

    March 11, 2015, 3:10 am

    There's a whole lot of wishful thinking and bad math in this response... Do you really, honestly think that the biggest contributing factor to *book publishing* is patent fees? *Really?* I mean, I'm sure it's down there somewhere, and maybe in some other industries it plays a significant (as in, noticeable, but still not influential) role, but certainly not in publishing.

    And even if you got rid of all IP, who is going to pay me while I work on a book before it makes any money? Who is going to pay me for the projects I do on a for-hire basis that *don't* make any money? Who is going to pay for the paper, or the lighting bills at the publishing company, or all the red-pens the copy-editors use?

    The simple fact is this: all business is gambling. Period. If you are a carpenter, you are gambling the cost of wood on the hope that someone will buy your table, or whatever. IP lowers the risk of this gamble in creative works, and thus allows more risk to be taken, meaning more business to be done, meaning more people like myself actually feeding their families. The idea that IP is only good for the "rich person who is enormously profiting off of the status quo" is just plain naive.

    Without a complete overhaul of the capitalistic system (which, if it were a good overhaul, I may certainly support) we *need* IP laws. Sure, they can be made better. I think copyrights should be far shorter than they are now (I think the 28 year + renewal model of the mid 20th century was preferable to what we have now; I think drug and medical companies need to have their patent laws completely revised so that life-saving technologies aren't kept from people who can't afford them, etc.

    But this idea that we can just eliminate IP regulations is just silly, and, from my vantage point, boils down to a bunch of non-creative people people whining because they want to get everything that creative people do for free...

    Reply

  • tessagrace

    tessagrace

    March 11, 2015, 3:22 am

    just hang in there, it gets easier over time. i'm gluten and dairy free (also a vegetarian) and i've gotten into a good routine with wheat substitutes and gluten-free pastas and cereals etc.

    as per eating out: try mexican (ask for corn tortillas), middle eastern food (most of the starch is rice) and chinese (just make sure they thicken their sauces with cornstarch, not flour).

    if you need help with recipes, google "gluten free forum" or "celiac disease forum" or something along those lines. people are very willing to help. where i live there are support groups too, if you're into that sort of thing. also, the staff at your local natural food store is usually pretty well-informed.

    good luck!

    Reply

  • slavox

    slavox

    March 10, 2015, 12:52 pm

    AFAIK they charged the individuals not the actual site, the site is still deemed legal in their country, but the individuals were charged with assisting to infringe copyright (Or some fancy legal term for helping people pirate)

    It will eventually go down, But for now it's up.

    Torrentfreak covered a lot of the news and speculation around this so check out their posts.

    Also for people who are thinking it's a sting operation, All public trackers are as good as stings are going to get and have been for years, If you're on a tracker that's open to everyone there is only a small amount of things that protect you from being "stung"

    Either use a private tracker, Use a VPN, Or stop pirating.

    Btw: They don't have enough manpower or "evidence" to track down all the IPs on the pirate bay, Which is why you weren't "stung" earlier on and equally so now you wont be..

    Reply

  • endless_mike

    endless_mike

    March 11, 2015, 12:28 am

    All right, forgive the bit of fiery rhetoric in my earlier post. You were making a better point than I originally gave you.

    I sometimes question the idea that being socialized is enough to justify certain actions. I guess I can't tell if you are saying it is a bit of a justification. Yes, it explains why so many people consume some types of animal flesh and not others. But many socially inherited practices I feel are wrong, no matter what the society might believe (e.g. female circumcision). And though, from that society's moral system, it might not seem immoral, I believe that they have the necessary premises to get to the argument that it is immoral within their system, so the practice is immoral for them. Obviously, willful ignorance is no excuse.

    Yes, my move to vegetarianism eventually came about due to my inability to ignore the philosophical arguments that I read, but also the nagging feeling that I had within me as I came to know more about the practices involved in food production.

    I think I might have been unclear when I said "we don't eat thing[s] based on suffering" (ugh, stupid typos). I guess my point was that the goal in our food-producing practices it the production of food, and that suffering seems to be just a necessary by-product. So, foie gras and veal aren't eaten based on the idea that the food requires suffering, it just happens to be that the production practice seems to necessitate it. As far as tortured dog is concerned, I hadn't heard of it, but the idea seems pretty messed up.

    Reply

  • gnjack

    gnjack

    March 11, 2015, 8:43 am

    Has anyone else noticed that the graph is wrong?

    Reading the values from the graph (actual value at end of line, not numbers in top right):

    Hits: >31500

    Upvotes: >1750

    Downvotes: >570

    Figures shown in top right:

    Hits: 27604

    Upvotes: 1470

    Downvotes: 486

    The graph lines seem to be much higher than they should be.

    Also, note neither of them match the current values on reddit - due the the experiment being complete (why was it ended so soon?).

    Reply

  • thecottonballsfw

    thecottonballsfw

    March 11, 2015, 2:02 am

    if you were in gifted classes, how do you know they werent teaching metrics in the regular classes as well.

    In my school system- gifted equaled more homework, but not necessarily faster pace. I didn't like homework, if i did it three or four times, i didn't need fourty times the re-inforcement, i was gifted after-all. And school never mattered much to me, i just did well enough to avoid punishment, and later, just to avoid catching lectures and shit from my parents.

    I settled on the fact that i wouldn't be spearheading revolutions in quantum mechanics in my life, so i just did well enough to not embarrass myself. But judging by my grammar, i may not have succeeded.

    Reply

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