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Comments

  • thunderlols

    thunderlols

    March 10, 2015, 10:57 am

    It's raining on my face.

    I like the idea that they are planting the seeds yearly. But I hate the idea that in a few years time, people won't remember why. Nor the sadness behind the reason. There are just too many things to buy, and too many great shows on television...

    --

    Edit: not sure about the downvoting. I guess my point was that even with 9/11 we do these things in America to "remember" the day, but we are, as a collective, miles away from where we were on 9/12 emotionally. Even on 9/11.

    Reply

  • ivybum

    ivybum

    March 11, 2015, 12:16 am

    Yes, they know, and yes, it's a wonderful school. If a citizen decides not to pay but to stay in the states, they will likely be caught. As would I. If a citizen decided to leave the country, their passport would take them to almost any country they were interested in, and they'd only have to get past security. If I wanted to leave, I'd almost certainly get stopped before boarding an international flight and then I'd be screwed. I don't think I have nothing to worry about if I decide not to pay my loans and leave. My school knows I will repay my debts, and I'll have no easier time dodging those than any other citizen.

    Reply

  • halo

    halo

    March 11, 2015, 4:18 am

    Although not Reddit server-related, clan people often come and play on a UK server I frequent, so I'll state my experiences.

    Clanners tend to be a very mixed bag in terms of ability, with the average being above the normal pub player, but the difference isn't quite as big as you'd assume.

    The very best TF2 players I've ever seen are clanners, not least the guy who got 10 dominations against our fairly competent team on Stage 3 Dustbowl. On the other hand, I've seen entire clans appear, stack the teams, then lose miserably as they're totally and utterly useless, forcing the admins to scramble to balance 'em out.

    Reply

  • rkcr

    rkcr

    March 11, 2015, 1:18 am

    > What is the strangest delivery you have made?

    I wouldn't say any were particularly strange... I delivered once to a house full of injured cats, but that was nice. (I remember this because the woman was holding a cat the entire time she paid for the pizza.)

    > Have you ever done something "bad" with the food you were delivering?

    No. Why would I? When you deliver you're mostly driving, not interacting with nasty customers.

    > Did you get free pizza? How much free pizza can you eat before your poo becomes strange?

    We were supposed to pay for the food we took (at a discount) but when the owner wasn't around the managers would let us have anything we want. It got really fun because you could just make whatever you want, I'd throw on 10 different toppings and see if it "worked". I think the glory of pizza is that it always works, regardless of the combination of stuff you put on.

    No comment on the other end, I don't remember anything about that. I limited myself to eating one thing from the pizza place any given night I worked anyways.

    > Was there any "regulars" you would deliver to frequently? Like 400 pound people living off junk food?

    There were regulars, but none of the ones I went to were particularly obese.

    > Did you get tips? If so what was the largest/best tip you've ever recieved (please reply gratuitous hummer from a MILF)

    Certainly, tips are expected in delivery. I've gotten some pretty good tips from stoners (they order $25 worth of pizza, then hand you two twenties).

    Story time (of the best tip I ever got): I was sent on a delivery to the edge of town, to a house that never tips. The manager warned me that this delivery would piss me off so I was ready to get nothing for my drive. When I got to the house a girl answered, she was maybe 12 years old. I asked for her parents but she said that she was going to handle buying the pizza; she looked dressed for a pool party so I figured they were just too busy, and besides she had cash.

    After getting the money out the mom showed up, and asked the girl what she was doing. She said, "I'm paying the pizza man, mommy! I'm giving him $4 tip!"

    Her response? "You've GOT to be kidding me!" Not a "you're so adult you're doing this on your own", but a "you're giving him a tip?" But then our eyes met, and we both realized that she couldn't take back the money now that her daughter had said she was going to give me a tip.

    It just made me happy, because it was a big rich house I was delivering to, and a few buck tip won't break the bank for them... also their daughter was more polite than the parents, hah.

    Reply

  • hivpoz

    hivpoz

    March 10, 2015, 9:18 pm

    Nope - never have done meth. As you may have picked up from some of my comments, I wasn't really part of that particular gay scene. Never been to a rave - I was more into pubs or sports bars. Never did party drugs. Occasional toke if someone had it. Snorted coke once when it was offered to me (by a gay guy) - was already drunk - don't remember it having any significant effect.

    This reminds me though - I think I have a couple of joints in my freezer. They've probably been there for 5 years. Buried under a couple of lasagnas.

    Reply

  • CarlH

    CarlH

    March 10, 2015, 10:14 pm

    It is a good question.

    It is not a difference in syntax that is causing you an issue here. Recall that it is impossible to directly see or work with any data larger than the standard data types. This includes especially strings.

    Therefore, if you have any operation in any language, C, C++, etc. that is going to work with strings, you are in one form or another working with pointers.

    When you write: `cout << f;` you have to ask yourself "What does cout expect?" The answer is *not* a string. it is a pointer to a string (More specifically it is how C++ has defined a string, but that is the subject of future lessons). Well, f happens to be just that. Therefore, cout gets f, a pointer to a string, and then works similarly to how printf() might work in a similar situation.

    I hope that clarifies things :)

    Reply

  • whitetaildeer

    whitetaildeer

    March 10, 2015, 10:12 pm

    one of my favorites was "climb as high as you can in a tree and jump", as well as, "climb to the peak of the barn roof and jump, hoping the snow is deep enough". I got hurt a lot. And I especially liked to play these games to impress the highschool girl who watched me when my parents where out. Now that I think about it, she must have been absolutely terrified whenever she babysat that she'd be held responsible for a broken leg or ankle.

    also, "get lost in the woods for long enough that all the neighbors are all driving up and down the road looking for you."

    nothing like growing up in the boondocks.

    Reply

  • eyal0

    eyal0

    March 10, 2015, 10:53 am

    Just a matter of practicality. Say the Palestinians have two choices:

    1) Take the best deal they can get now.

    2) Continue their struggle and then take the best deal they can get in a year.

    The second option only makes sense if Palestinians will be in a better bargaining position in a year. So far it seems like their position is only getting worse, so taking a deal now seems better. You can argue justice but it doesn't help. In Israel there is a saying, "Don't be right, be smart."

    A good analogy is complaining that you won't get enough money for your car if you sell it today, so wait a year and try again.

    As distasteful as you find it, am I wrong in my reasoning?

    Reply

  • jofo

    jofo

    March 10, 2015, 6:32 pm

    A dustman is going along a street picking up the wheely bins and emptying them into his dustcart lorry.

    He gets to one house where the bin hasn't been left out so he has a quick look for it, goes round the back but still can't see it so he knocks on the door.

    There's no answer so he knocks again.

    Eventually a Chinese bloke answers... "Harro", says the Chineseman.

    "Alright mate, where's your bin?" asks the dustman

    "I bin on toilet" replies the Chinese bloke, looking perplexed.

    Realising the Chinese fellow has misunderstood, the binman smiles and says "No mate, where's ya dust bin?"

    "I dust bin on toilet I told you" says the Chinese man.

    "Mate" says the dustman... "you're misunderstanding me...where's your Wheely Bin?"

    "OK" "OK" , the chinaman says, "I wheely bin having wank."

    Reply

  • sonofabitch

    sonofabitch

    March 11, 2015, 12:29 am

    Patents only cover "new and useful process[es], machine[s], manufacture[s], or composition[s] of matter, or any new and useful improvement[s] thereof" (35 USC §101). As they need to be "useful", a painting doesn't fall into that classification; at least not in what the painting depicts. You can't get a patent on a drawing of flowers, because there's no usefulness in such a painting (though they look so nice).

    A copyright covers: "original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. Works of authorship include the following categories:

    (1) literary works;

    (2) musical works, including any accompanying words;

    (3) dramatic works, including any accompanying music;

    (4) pantomimes and choreographic works;

    (5) pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works;

    (6) motion pictures and other audiovisual works;

    (7) sound recordings; and

    (8) architectural works." (17 USC §102).

    17 USC §102 goes on to note that:

    "(b) In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work."

    I.e. Something that's a patent can't be a copyright also.

    The software code itself is copyrighted (so you can't copy win.exe); the processes inside are patented (so you can't have a similar method in your OS).

    Reply

  • lukey

    lukey

    March 10, 2015, 8:13 am

    I was moved in a Gifted/Talented stream in elementary school. We had totally separate classes. There were about a dozen of us in a split-class with another grade. We didn't do any sort of class rotation except for things like gym. The rest of the time was sort of a generic mush of "school", in the same room, with the same teacher, doing whatever usually. "Independent projects/study" most of the time.

    Then in high school, for the first two years we had a special program called "The Academy". It was a bit bigger than the elementary class size, about 40 students each year. It occupied half the day and we received normal course credit for required courses (English, Math, Science, etc), and for the other half, we took whatever regular elective classes we wanted. The gimmick was that they integrated the learning across subject areas...ie., you would write an historical novel for both English and History course credits.

    After the second year, for the rest of high school we had a special academic counselor. This counselor could advocate for you with certain inflexible teachers, and keep you apprised of special programs being offered at the board-wide level. (For example, I did a pretty cool seminar with Mark Tilden, who designed the RoboSapiens robot...he got us to make our own robots using scavenged/surplus electronic components.)

    I absolutely hated it. I have to emphasize that it came down to crappy staff/teachers. My "special needs" included the need to set my own areas of study. I think they called it "self-determination". Can anyone imagine that within an elementary or high school? The teachers we had were not at all understanding of what the kids really needed...and typically were only involved because it was considered a teacher-status thing. Basically, the teachers were idiots.

    I ended up quitting the program much to the consternation of the administrators and my parents. Apparently, this was extremely rare, and the fact that I left was a kind of black mark in their view. In fact, I was badgered for years afterwards, and no amount of explanation would seem to satisfy the adults. But the fact was, they didn't do anything special, and it was of no use to me. None at all. I kept on saying that, but it really seemed that everyone else was annoyed that I hadn't been brainwashed. I kept being told...just go along with things. Total scam.

    Once in the regular stream, I could safely tune out and do my own thing. I have a pretty high reading speed and a decent recall rate...so I basically got through the rest of high school without having to actually tune in to anything that was happening. This really freed me up to do my own thing, and to learn about whatever interested me. I remember doing a matriculation-level course in a matter of two weeks and scoring 160% on the final exam...of course, this was adjusted downwards. I used to turn up to study-hall instead of the classroom, so that I could be marked present...but then I didn't have to be annoyed by whatever was happening in the classrooms. I had a lot of meetings with the vice principal over my non-attendance and non-participation.

    In adult life, I've picked a career where I set my own schedule and have essentially zero structure.

    Reply

  • GreenGlassDrgn

    GreenGlassDrgn

    March 10, 2015, 1:20 pm

    yeah. you are. now instead of killing the external enemy and bonding for 6 months before finding the next enemy, how about splitting that nation up in those two parts like you ware about to a hundred years ago? That'll at least keep the politicians busy with the infrastructure and keep the rest of the world safe from american intervention for a while... And then you can war amongst yourselves!

    (And people think that the one-world government is a threat - hah! cant even keep track of europe and the usa as it is...)

    Reply

  • Ardentfrost

    Ardentfrost

    March 10, 2015, 7:21 am

    My elem school had a program called "SOAR" which stood for Students On Active Research (whatever that means).

    In second grade you were invited to go if you excelled enough. The program would bus you off to another location one day a week where they aggregated all the elementary schools in the area into the program. In all there were about 20 kids from each school.

    So they send me to this thing and I can't even remember everything we did, but I remember I thought what we were doing was too easy to really be for smart kids. The logical conclusion, then, was that it was *actually* for stupid kids and they had lied to me to make me *feel* special and willing to go.

    I cried my eyes out over this. I was convinced that while they had removed the poor performers from class, the other kids were advancing unhindered by us. My parents and my teacher all tried to assure me that wasn't the case, but for about a month I didn't believe them.

    A few years after I left elem school I heard some minority parents accused the program of being racist (even though there were certainly minorities with me in the program). The parents yelled and screamed until they changed the program so that *all* kids were in the "smart" program.

    Reply

  • VicinSea

    VicinSea

    March 10, 2015, 10:34 am

    >Despite this, there is no federal requirement for grinders to test their ingredients for the pathogen.

    The reason why producers are not required to test ground meat is that every single batch would test positive for E.Coli. There is no way to know if the positive test is a fairly benign strain of E.Coli or a deadly one, like this was, without full DNA testing. DNA testing "takes too long" to be useful in testing food.

    The best method I have seen so far--take a 4-6 ounce steak and sear it in a very hot pan-just long enough to heat all the outside surfaces to above 160. Then drop the steak in a food processor and chop it medium fine, form into a patty and return to the pan on medium high and cook as usual. It is safe to prepare a rare or medium rare burger if you use this method. I bet very few people have ever tasted a rare burger(on purpose)-they are delicious!

    Reply

  • Draiko

    Draiko

    March 10, 2015, 7:46 am

    Even at the risk of extreme downvotes I can't keep from speaking my mind on this...

    You ask how much $600 is really and you call yourself a business coder? What kind of efficiency is that?

    $600 is $600. Professionals could still buy more with $600 in their pockets. I should know, I am one and I save more than $600 by not owning an iPhone. I've tried a 3G and 3GS... I remain unimpressed.

    The iPhone might have around 50 good apps.

    The real question is, why do professionals pay $600+ extra just to have a phone with 75,000 $1 fart apps?

    I'll keep my year-old Sprint Diamond... WMWifirouter, wmtorrent, kinoma play (with Orb), full voice command, MMS, Video recording, Sprint TV, games (XTRAKT!), and GPS software have made it FAR more useful (and entertaining) than Apple's super-restricted child's toy. I've had every single "new iPhone 3GS feature" since last September. Plus I get that $600+ in my pocket... oh yeah... I have an extended battery too. Having to buy a special $100 battery case for extra juice was a big dealbreaker for the iPhone in my book.

    Android, WebOS, and even Windows mobile are far better platforms than iPhoneOS... IF you know how to use them.

    I'm going to go hide in a corner as my comment karma takes a nosedive.

    Reply

  • rkcr

    rkcr

    March 10, 2015, 10:58 pm

    When I was working pizza delivery I hadn't smoked before, but I imagine it would make me a lot worse at my job. The thing about delivery is, the more deliveries you make, the more you make in tips. So if you go slowly, you're going to make less. (Not to mention the safety hazard.)

    My managers were all potheads. The owner seemed naively oblivious to this fact. My coworkers tended to fall into three categories:

    1. High schoolers using this as a part time job. Typically not stoners.

    2. People who were working during a summer/winter break from college (like me). Probably stoners but none really on the job.

    3. People who couldn't find a better job because the owner paid the managers decently. Stoned on the job all the time.

    There are most certainly pothead pizza joints though. I've got a friend who worked a place near where I live now that's sadly gone out of business in the last year, but he said it was usual for the entire staff to smoke up after the store closed.

    Reply

  • k4r3n

    k4r3n

    March 10, 2015, 6:22 pm

    Oh yeah, the class where everyone was told what brilliant people they were. We were never taught any of the basic things like grammar because GAT took the place of our English classes, even though we were studying math, science, SAT prep and problem solving. So we were all smart, but couldn't spell worth a crap without spellcheck, so we looked like morons on paper most of the time.

    I still have issues with the fact that they insisted we were all going to be doctors and lawyers and cure cancer or something. It was never IF we became a doctor, it was WHEN.

    None of us has cured cancer yet, but I'm hoping its just because we can't spell the cure.

    Reply

  • mensrea

    mensrea

    March 10, 2015, 9:03 pm

    There's not one thing you cane do on your phone that I can't do on my iPhone. Not one. But I guarantee that there are several hundred that I can do that you can't. Now, the people at your work very well may be idiots, but... that has nothing to do with how capable their phones are.

    Say you don't like the phone. Fine. Pretend like it's still running os 1.0 and some weirdo hasn't already invented and begun to sell a physical keyboard attachment (cause they have and I know at least one of you wants to post that as something I can't do - bing it) is just sad.

    Reply

  • phlux

    phlux

    March 11, 2015, 4:09 am

    >I'm really not here to have the "my marital art is better/more complete than yours" talk.

    Yeah, absolutely was not trying to do that - What I am saying is that the assumption made by temP-redditname that there is not training in bone breaking/brutal techniques in martial arts that are very old is false.

    >Anyone that says they've learned enough to keep from being savaged with a screwdriver in the kidneys is a lying sack of shit.

    actually this is the thing that really scares me the most -- not the training that some other person has, but the incredible desire/capability within the human condition (as you alluded to) for complete brutal violence.

    The thing that I am most afraid of encountering is someone with a knife that knows how to use it. We do a lot of training with knives and swrds - but the thought of getting sliced by one is very very chilling.

    Reply

  • Pomond

    Pomond

    March 10, 2015, 1:30 pm

    Not my experience at all. I have been using Joomla as my standard CMS solution for many clients, and I've found that they have been able to very quickly pick up its usage and take over many aspects of managing their own Web sites themselves. Of course, I provide my own custom documentation package to my Joomla clients, and I offer on-site training for their clients if they need it, but I'd provide this to any client who is adopting and deploying a new tool in their organization. Some other likes about Joomla: 1) It is stable. (In my experience.) If it fails, it fails gracefully. 2) Pretty much everything can be customized, and there is a great separation between presentation and content. 3) There is a gigantic ecosystem of third-party developers and institutional users who support the project through add-ons, business services, training sites, etc.

    Reply

  • propylene22

    propylene22

    March 11, 2015, 4:15 am

    I don't think anyone is evil, and that dissenting options are great I just feel that there is an underlying tension in our country. I also feel that people are being forced to join on bandwagon or another, in that they feel that they must support the lesser of two evils. Maybe complacency has led to the divide growing to the chasm that we see these days. Also I believe that we are sitting pretty compared to the economic crisises that are to come, along with global climate change. The struggle for resourced is going to intensify in a way that we have never before seen.

    Reply

  • Turil

    Turil

    March 10, 2015, 2:02 pm

    Excellent point. Innovation and new ideas are not only good for making progress, but serve as a back-up for when what's currently working stops working because the factors change.

    Which means that we need to spend perhaps a half of our research funding on ideas that are completely "out there".

    I also suggest that every institution and organization of any sort have at least a couple resident crazy wisdom posts where the people who have the most unusual ideas are allowed to play without having to be practical at all, as long as they keep coming up with new ideas. Maybe 20% following the 80-20 rule of 80% of the work getting done by 20% of the people.

    Reply

  • thruxtonion

    thruxtonion

    March 11, 2015, 5:39 am

    Just personal choice. I was using an online service (blog.com i think) and they moved over from their regular platform which was very minimalist and user friendly, to Word Press. It was a big seachange for me and I had four-six blogs hosted on the service and with the new Word Press service I lost all of them except for my primary blog (the one I started when I established my account).

    I blame Word Press for this.

    I had a couple friends from Uni who had the same problem and the help centre wasn't very helpful.

    But I guess if you're starting out it won't be so bad. I didn't want to be put on the learning curve again.

    Reply

  • MaeveSuave

    MaeveSuave

    March 10, 2015, 6:23 pm

    Yup, high school gifted program in a small town in Kansas. It was essentially the brainchild of a single teacher. She traveled to all of the schools in the county to teach the best and brightest. Two classes each week.

    The program was pretty excellent. Each student would write their goals for the year, something they thought was worthwhile, to be approved by the teacher. Then, through the year, you did them.

    I read books on theoretical physics: Feynman, Hawking, Gell-Mann. Wrote a half-assed screenplay. Wrote up my very own universal field theory. Studied early American history.

    Reply

  • xtom

    xtom

    March 10, 2015, 7:51 am

    Yeah once again: this was probably not a shining moment.

    But understand that anyone coming from an opposing side on reddit lives in a perpetual state of trying to explain things to people who won't listen to criticism. Or even respond to it. It's much easier to downvote...It's pretty hard to not get jaded after awhile.

    If there's one thing I've figured out it's that it doesn't matter how reliable your sources are, what numbers you use, or what quotes you use. People just downvote dissent. And I'd be lying if I said that didn't affect the quality of posts people put out after being on here for awhile. It's just not worth the effort sometimes.

    Reply

  • rondkyk

    rondkyk

    March 10, 2015, 10:26 am

    *Gripe #1.1*

    > Drupal stores logs in the database.

    You do not have to use the database logging module, and if you do, set the size of your database log here: "admin/settings/logging/dblog" for Drupal 6. Your web server logs are still available and depend entirely on your server configuration - nothing to do with Drupal.

    *Gripe #1.2*

    > Drupal stores templates in the database.

    Repeating myself in another post, you do not need to save templates in the database at any stage, just like with logs, it remains an option.

    *Gripe #2*

    > my Drupal clients are so confused by the interface

    That, my dear Drupal developer (an oxymoron, as you pointed out) is your own wrongdoing. Get clients to update their content through your Django admin interface? Drupal is not Wordpress, or some other blogging software. You'll have to set up your own use cases for different users and create administration interfaces accordingly. Not hard to do at all: Create a simple dashboard with a view of recent activity and you're done.

    *Gripe #3*

    > Drupal’s Design is Piss-Poor

    As of Drupal 6, PHP 4 is still used for backwards compatibility. Get your OOP love in Drupal 7 and PHP 5. The comment about major version upgrades being a hassle is mostly true. Minor security updates and bug fixes, on the other hand, aren't.

    /lazy "drupal developer" fanboy rant

    EDIT: Got 1.1 and 1.2 mixed up!

    Reply

  • SpongeJim

    SpongeJim

    March 10, 2015, 11:19 am

    I was not in the gifted program. At my elementary school it consisted of the 5 top students going to a different room for "more advanced" versions of what the rest of us were doing at that particular time of the day. However I *was* sent to take the aptitude tests with these same 5 whenever they were called to do so. I found that quite vexing, and I would often think "why do I have to take these tests with the 'smart kids'?".

    The biggest difference academically between those kids and me was that I had trouble with math/science back then. With english I was always at/near the top. I had no concept of this at the time, I just thought I was average overall, and that spelling/english was "easy". Teachers would at times give me grief for not doing well in math/science, but I thought they were being unreasonable.

    Fast forward to ninth/tenth grade. I got the same math teacher both years, and she would *not* let me accept less than the "smart" kids - always singling me out if I wasn't in the top 10 or so, and keeping on me hard about doing my homework the right way. Somewhere along the way it all clicked (I believe the turning point was my grade 10 final exam - it seemed too easy).

    Anyway by the end of highschool those "smart kids" from the elementary school days were all asking me to help them with math, and I went on to get a Bachelor of Mathematics (majoring in CS). I don't think anyone from elementary school would have pegged me going down that road. Of course, without that one teacher I probably wouldn't have.

    tl;dr - My point is twofold. Not all kids who go into the gifted programs are actually gifted - they are often more mature at a younger age or have been coached to a certain point by their parents. That's not to say they shouldn't be given the chance to excel, but that I think in some regions the authorities involved don't put enough effort into identifying who *needs* a chance to excel. That, and a really good teacher in the regular stream can still cultivate talent - there simply aren't enough of them.

    Reply

  • GreenGlassDrgn

    GreenGlassDrgn

    March 10, 2015, 12:22 pm

    DITTO!

    "Rise and Shine" still makes me instinctually wanna throw things at the speaker's general direction. Even worse: mom'd put on "It's a Beautiful Day" by Queen and play that VERY VERY loud if her 'rise and shine' tactic didn't work... (shudder!)... And since I moved away from home I realized Im actually very productive in the morning, as long as you dont hit me with a 'RISE AND SHINE' (cuz then Ill hate you and the rest of the world as only a teenager could the rest of the day)... My dad loved to sleep in, he understood it, he'd just stand there and make a nice soft knocking sound until Id gradually wake up and be happy...

    Reply

  • superkow

    superkow

    March 10, 2015, 7:40 pm

    I bought map pack 2 for my brothers birthday (I got him MS points and I only play WaW with him so I got the same DLC he did) and I've only played on one of the maps I got and it was a 5 vs 2 bore-fest.

    What shits me is there are two seperate lobbies, one for regular matchmaking, and one for DLC. You can't play regular for more than a few matches without owning all the DLC.

    You can't play in the DLC lobby without owning them all either.

    Trayarch pretty much tries to scam you into spending more money to play a game you've already paid for by making it nigh on impossible to get any satisfaction out of it till you fork over some extra cash.

    Being said though, Der Reise does look pretty damn sweet (and I dont even like Nazi Zombies). Maybe Treyass should just forget about trying to top Infinity Ward and make a stand alone zombie game.

    Reply

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